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Case Study 1.
Digital Exhibition Identity

Working closely with the experienced in-house team at The Getty Research Institute, we were able to conceptualize an online exhibition that addressed many issues uniquely catered to the experience of a digital exhibition. We began with the curator of the exhibit who took us into The Getty Research Institute’s impressive special collection room. Instantly, we were flooded with a wealth of materials and artifacts to source from. This visit would eventually greatly inform the design of the exhibition.

We were particularly drawn towards an 18th century travel book The Ruins of Palmyra by Robert Wood, which became the core inspiration for the single column, classical typographic layout of the exhibition. The structure of this book was ahead of its time as it introduced summary notes alongside many of the writings. They acted as a roadmap for readers, guiding them throughout. This way of reading seemed appropriate for today’s world to help absorb online content and counteract information overload. We referenced this structure by including similar summary notes in the exhibit, and were able to provide both a micro and macro way for visitors to read and experience the information. One could read through dense scholarly material while another visitor could access the same webpage and quickly skim through the summary notes and focus more on the imagery.

The Ruins of Palmyra by Robert Wood

Just as it is important to create empty space between art pieces in a physical exhibition, we too wanted to give viewers moments to pause and digest the material. The website is carefully sequenced to control the pacing so a viewer does not become overwhelmed. Dingbats designed from archived etchings by Louis-François Cassas frame significant quotes and poignant messages, transforming them into poetic visual pauses between sections.

Though an online exhibition could never compete with or replace the visceral experience of a physical in-person exhibition, we wanted to take full advantage of the features that only a digital landscape could provide. To map Palmyra we utilized the infinite space available to us online. Cassas’ 18th century etching of Palmyra’s city plan was rescanned and programmed to function as a web mapping system much like the GoogleMap interface. When using a smartphone, visitors can pinch and zoom to survey the map in increasing detail, a level of interaction that only an online platform could activate.

The website was launched in conjunction with The Getty Research Institute symposium Palmyra and Aleppo: Syria’s Cultural Heritage in Conflict. The symposium created a space for discourse amongst scholars and activists. The goal was to start conversations that highlight the urgency needed to resolve the current conflict through diplomacy and UNESCO’s guidance.

Mobile view

Just as it is important to create empty space between art pieces in a physical exhibition, we too wanted to give viewers moments to pause and digest the material. The website is carefully sequenced to control the pacing so a viewer does not become overwhelmed. Dingbats designed from archived etchings by Louis-François Cassas frame significant quotes and poignant messages, transforming them into poetic visual pauses between sections.

Though an online exhibition could never compete with or replace the visceral experience of a physical in-person exhibition, we wanted to take full advantage of the features that only a digital landscape could provide. To map Palmyra we utilized the infinite space available to us online. Cassas’ 18th century etching of Palmyra’s city plan was rescanned and programmed to function as a web mapping system much like the GoogleMap interface. When using a smartphone, visitors can pinch and zoom to survey the map in increasing detail, a level of interaction that only an online platform could activate.

Mobile view

Case Study 2.
Publication Design

When Surfer Magazine approached us to design the entire issue of one of their special edition Salted issues, featuring female surf culture, we wanted to learn as much as we could about their business as well as surf culture itself. Because we are not experts in every type of sector, or one’s specific business’ culture, it is important that there is an open communication between designer and client. Unfamiliar with the surf world, we had in depth dialogue with the magazine’s in-house photographer, editors, and art directors to better understand the context of the project. This was an eye-opening experience as we gained insight into not only surf culture itself, but the often marginalized women’s surf world.

Learning about an organization in its entirety, along with opening the door to as much dialogue as possible, informs the work that we do. This tactic allows us to provide better solutions because we understand fully the client’s needs and goals for not only this particular issue, but for the organization as a whole. This type of attention to the company’s big picture is the best way to utilize our services to their fullest potential, so that we can incorporate what we learn into every detail of the design. From start to finish, the layout, typography, and hand lettering was tailored to give the spotlight to women in surfing. We executed our unique artistic aesthetic throughout the issue, but were also able to genuinely celebrate this specific sport and the brand’s culture.

Salted, Issue 3

Case Study 3.
Brand Identity

eReal Estate Corp initially approached us to redesign their logo for the header on their website. Their project brief was minimal, had a limited level of design engagement, and could not fully articulate their overall design goals with us. However, just as they “guide their clients through every aspect of the real estate process” we wanted to guide them through designing for the bigger picture.

Some clients may see different design elements, a logo, a brochure, a poster, a webpage, as singular stand alone design projects. However, these elements have so much potential to establish or propel forward a corporate identity. We looked at the functionality of the website, and how it was communicating information about their services and the type of real estate they work with.

Instead of just designing the logo independently, we executed a sophisticated message behind the logo. The new design shows how the website can display enough information for prospective homebuyers and how to create an appealing home for sale.

Even though they were initially unable to visualize the true scope of their brand identity and only focused on a singular design issue, we were able to apply a more holistic approach. This shifted their point of view on how to approach their brand identity and allowed us to focus on how this logo would not just live passively at the top of their webpage, but help to fulfill their greater goals.

A logo inspired from an asterisk. An asterisk functions as a strong invisible force. It is used in literature as a footnoting device. It attracts attention without yelling to readers.